Nightingale July 1919In his book, The Fabulous Phonograph, Roland Gelatt states that in 1919 there were nearly 200 phonograph manufacturers in the U.S. Throughout the 1910’s the demand for phonographs and records exceeded supply. Many new companies entered this lucrative field as basic phonographs patents held by Victor, Columbia, and Edison were expiring. Many companies advertised in the phonograph trade journal, The Talking Machine World (TMW). Below is a listing of the “off brand” phonographs from the 1910 to 1925 era. Not including major companies—Aeolian-Vocalion, Brunswick, Columbia, Edison, Pathé, Sonora, and Victor—the list totaled over 400 companies.

Many of these companies were local in production and distribution whereas others, such as Cheney and Starr, enjoyed national distribution. It was not unusual for a furniture, department, piano, or music store to sell phonographs under its own name. To supply these stores, some cabinet manufacturing firms made and sold complete brand “X” phonographs while others sold just the cabinets. Motors, reproducers, tone arms, and other hardware could be purchased from a number of independent manufacturers; the Otto Heineman Phonograph Supply Company in New York was especially important for providing basic parts. Other hardware producers were the Arrow Motor Company of Newark, New Jersey, and The René Manufacturing Company in Hillsdale, New Jersey. Many companies used spring motors imported from Switzerland.

Not every phonograph manufacturer is represented in the following list. Some regional companies considered their advertising dollars to be poorly spent in a national trade publication as The Talking Machine World. On the other hand, some small companies are surprisingly prominent in TMW. The Delpheon Company of Bay City, Michigan, paid for large advertisements in most issues from 1916 to 1918, yet only a handful of Delpheon machines are known to exist today. Heavy advertising in TMW did not guarantee brisk sales.

With hundreds of phonograph brands on the market, executives of new firms had difficulty selecting distinct and memorable names for their products. Some companies limited their range of possibilities by following a trend of adding “-ola” to a prefix. The Robinola’s name no doubt was derived from the robin’s reputation for song; the Harmonola’s name was clearly derived from “harmony.” Some company owners added “-ola” to their own names. William Tonk called his machine the Tonkola. The machine made by Sachs and Company was called the Saxola. Other company owners simply named machines after themselves—hence, the Cheney, Crafts, Crippen, Emerson, Fisher, Heintzman, Heywood-Wakefield, Onken, Steger, Weser and Wilson. The Bush & Lane Company’s Cecilaphone was named after Saint Cecilia, patron saint of music.

Qualities Shared By Many Machines

Most tone arms sold by independent makers were of the “universal” type which held reproducers that could be turned and positioned to play either lateral or vertical shellac records. The tone arms varied in size and shape; most were composed of two or more sections and were not truly tapered in design since that would violate the tapered tone arm patent still held by the Victor Talking Machine Company. Most brands used a mica diaphragm in the reproducer. To the dismay of collectors today, many of the “off brand” phonographs have tone arms and reproducers made of pot metal which has not aged well and now tends to be brittle and break easily. They are difficult to repair or replace though some collectors have made successful repairs using epoxy resins. It is also possible to replace a broken tone arm and reproducer with a generic one. The antique phonograph parts dealers and repairmen usually have boxes or bins of original and reproduction phonograph parts. They can also repair or replace broken springs and they sell new loud volume and soft volume steel needles, usually in packets of 100 needles.

By 1919 most phonograph cabinets were made of veneers. High quality three to five-ply veneers were produced and were excellent for phonograph cabinets. Good quality veneers have less tendency to warp than solid woods. Mahogany, walnut, oak, birch, and gum were the woods most often used, mahogany and oak being the most popular. Spruce was the wood favored for internal horns because of its evenly proportioned grain; it was considered to provide an ideal sound chamber. Norway pine, hemlock, balsam fir, and white pine were also used for internal horns.

Unique Qualities

Though machines made by different companies shared qualities, unique features and designs were carefully advertised. The Hoffay was promoted as being “airtight” for better sound production. The Brooks featured an automatic repeater and stop device. The Classique had a rubber turntable and tone arm while the Dolce-Tone had a reproducer with a fabric diaphragm. The Cheney and Crystola reproducers used molded gutta-percha diaphragms. The Fulton had a spun internal horn. The Olympian was advertised as a small “apartment sized” console. The Ko-Hi-Ola was a tall structure that contained a phonograph, record shelves, a large clock on top, and even a “secret” compartment. The internal horn of the Crystola was made of mirror-polished plate glass while the Kurtzman featured plate glass turntable and motor board. The Ceramiphone featured a ceramic horn. Perhaps the most remarkable was the Shell-O-Phone which featured an internal horn made from a large conch-shell collected on the beach of a South Seas island.

Deca-Disc and Mavelola produced semi-automatic models that could play in succession a small stack of discs. The Electric was a coin-operated automatic phonograph that held 24 cylinders. The Lyradion was one of the first radio-phonograph cabinets (April 1922); a 2-stage direct current Westinghouse receiver was included. The Phono-Grand, made by the J. P. Seeburg Piano Co. and advertised as “small enough…to fit the apartment of the man of moderate means,” was a combined talking machine and player piano, playing regular 78 rpm discs and standard Q.R.S. 88 note player rolls. The Phonola was an upright cabinet which was collapsible; advertisements claimed it could be assembled in 60 seconds. Instead of a grille in front of the horn, the Ton-O-Graf had a sliding shutter which could be adjusted “for perfect tone control.” The Orsenigo Company made amazingly large, ornate, and expensive cabinet models.

Pressing a button in the Supreme illuminated three lights, one each for the turntable, tone chamber, and record compartment. Most impressive was the grille that contained stained glass and was illuminated by the tone chamber light; the grille could be swiveled to an open position when playing records. A few firms made wicker cabinets, considered the best cabinets for use outdoors; the Lakeside Supply Company’s “Art-Kraft Luxfibre” case sold for $200 to $300, depending on finish and hardware. In 1922 Blue Bird introduced a “teacart” model which resembled a tea cart on wheels. Emerson models featured a beautiful built-in Music Master horn which was round in shape and made of spruce. Phon-O-Bench made a piano bench model large enough for a phonograph and record storage; it could also be used as a window seat. The Davis Company produced one model with a triangular-shaped cabinet—to conveniently fit into the corner of a room.

Kiddie Machines, Phonolamps, Portables

A number of small upright and console models were made for children though most were small table models. The Diamond Juvenile console, well crafted in simple “Mission” style, was painted white with blue trim and had a 9-inch turntable. Other brands were Baby, Bobolink, Kiddiephone, and Toyphone.

Several firms manufactured phonograph lamps. The Phonolamp was perhaps the most amazing because of its stained glass shade. The Modernola was an upright phonograph with a large lamp elevated above the cabinet. The Lampograph was another brand. Several firms manufactured phonographs with the shape of baby grand pianos, such as the Venus Bell, Phono-Grand, and Fern-O-Grand. Library tables with a phonograph concealed inside were produced by Librola, Phonographic Table, Tabe-A-Nola, and Tabla-Tone. For the latter the phonograph was held within a pull-out drawer.

Beginning around 1916, several firms produced portable “suitcase” models. A few, such as the Stewart Military and the Recruit, were originally designed for sailors and soldiers. Other portable brands were Piknik, Cirola, Melophone, Portrola, and Spraytone. In the summer of 1922 portable models were heavily advertised as ideal for picnics, camping, and back porch listening. In 1925 Carryola introduced the “Flapper” portable which resembled a ladies hat box; it came with a covering of DuPont Fabrikoid or grained imitation leather with tan edging. The Mignonphon was a very small portable about the size of a lady’s vanity case; it weighed less than five pounds. Portable models became major selling phonographs; by 1926 no less than twenty-two off-brand portable models were available: Allen, Camp=Fone, Carry-A-Phone, Carryola, Caswell, Charmaphone, Empire, Favorola, Gem, Kamophone, Madison, Mignonphon, Minelli, Oro-Tone, Outing, Pal, Plymouth, Spencerian, Swanson, Travelphone, Waters & Conley, and Wonder. Some firms made more than one portable model.

The very small “cameraphones” were also popular. These miniature machines were designed to fold parts into a small case resembling a small box camera. Most were European made; Fremont, Kompact, Peter Pan, Pet-O-Fone, and Terephon are examples.

Related Products

Some of the off-brand companies also produced records. With only a few exceptions, such as Emerson, records made before 1919 were vertical cut. Emerson, Paramount, Rex, and Starr recorded their own material. Pathé produced pressings for Empire and World. The Bell Record Corporation produced records for Schubert. Resona had record sources from Paramount, Plaza, and Emerson. Cardinal produced its own records until 1922 when its records came from Starr. According to Brian Rust’s The American Record Label Book, Phonolamp issued less than a dozen recordings. The records were not sold but included with a Phonolamp purchase; Gray Gull was the source of these rare discs. Arrow and Mandel also briefly sold records. The New York Recording Laboratories of Port Washington, Wisconsin, which pressed Paramount discs, supplied records for Puritan, Harmograh, and Mozart.

Firms made record cabinets in all shapes and styles. The Schloss Brothers in New York and the Udell works in Indianapolis made cabinets specifically to hold the common Victor and Columbia table models; some cabinets held the phonograph exposed on top of the cabinet while others held the phonograph within the cabinet and could be covered by a lid. Other record cabinet firms were the Berkeley Cabinet Company, Century Cabinet Company, Federal Equipment Company, Grand Rapids Cabinet Company, Hawthorne & Sheble, Herzog Art Furniture Company, New Idea Cabinet Company, George A. Long Cabinet Company, C. J. Lundstrom Manufacturing Company, Pooley Furniture Company, Salter Manufacturing Company, and Value-Tone Talking Machine Manufacturing Company.

Herzog Cabinets April 1918

Long Cabinets April 1917
Long Cabinet March 1919

Michigan As A Manufacturing Center

The center for cabinet production in the United States was Michigan, especially in and around Grand Rapids. The famous Berkey and Gay Furniture Company of Grand Rapids made cabinets for the Cheney Talking Machine Company. Cheney also made cabinets at another facility in Grand Rapids. American, Art Craft, Crescent, L’Artiste, Lauzon, and Widdicomb phonographs were made in Grand Rapids. The Aeolian Company had a major assembly plant on Lyon Street. Metal parts for talking machines were produced by the Grand Rapids Brass Company, the Grand Rapids Foundry Company, the Otto Heineman Phonograph Supply Company, and the Rathbone Fireplace Manufacturing Company. The Klise Manufacturing Company designed and made carved phonograph posts, grilles, moldings, etc.

Meisselbach motors AmericanPhonoPartsJuly1916 Klise Cabinet Jan 1919

Grand Rapids held semi-annual furniture exhibits. Several downtown buildings were used, most notably the Gilbert and Klingman Exhibition Buildings and the Furniture Temple. By the late 1910’s the talking machine industry had taken over most of the exhibits, companies competing with elaborate machine displays and demonstrations. The Otto Heineman Company (later the General Phonograph Corporation) turned over the first floor of its Okeh Building to exhibits.

Other areas of Michigan produced phonographs. In mid-1919 the Sonora Phonograph Company opened an assembly factory in Saginaw and company headquarters were moved in the summer of 1927, to Saginaw. The Brunswick-Balke-Collender Company had major facilities in Muskegon. The Bush and Lane and Cecilaphone phonographs were made in Holland (Michigan), the Delpheon in Bay City, the Dulcitone in South Haven, and the Manophone in Adrian. Most companies had main offices or manufacturing facilities in Chicago or New York City.

The Season of Heavy Sales

H. B. Bibb, the sales manager of the Brunswick-Balke-Collender Company, produced a chart for the June 15, 1919 Talking Machine World. Each of the twelve slices in the pie chart represents monthly percentages of sales in a year. The chart was prepared from data collected from all parts of the U.S. and from merchants selling various makes of talking machines. Nearly half of the annual sales of talking machines were made in November and December. Manufacturers and dealers knew well in advance to have abundant supplies ready for holiday sales. Because many homes had new machines in December, January was generally good for record sales.

Because the Christmas season was universally recognized as the year’s most important sales period, many companies introduced new models in the autumn, in time for dealers to place orders. If we can judge from TMW advertisements, perhaps more new companies introduced machines in the months of August, September, and October of 1917 than during any other quarter year of the acoustic era. Despite shortages caused by World War I, in 1918 the autumn months of that year nearly match those of 1917 in the introduction of new companies.

The End Of A Boom

By mid-1920 signs of an oversold market and a general business slow-down were evident. On June 5, 1920, A. J. Kendrick of the Brunswick-Balke-Collender Company sent a message to Brunswick dealers: “It is quite reasonable to anticipate that some manufacturers will shortly find themselves seriously presented with a condition of overproduction, and unless he has fortified himself against such a period he and his dealers must inevitably suffer when that time comes.” By 1921 overproduction and a business depression marked the end of the phonograph boom and most of the 400 plus companies were gradually forced out of business.

Some companies of the late 1910’s did not survive as late as 1920 despite booming times. Bankruptcies were routinely announced in TMW. For example, a late 1917 issue of TMW announced the auctioning of the Flemish Phonograph Company to take place on November 20 at 10:30 AM at the Flemish factory in Brooklyn. The inventory included 2,000 phonographs and 40,000 records.

The December 15, 1922 TMW presents a U.S. Department of Commerce report concluding that total value of products of the U.S. phonograph industry had declined 38.1 percent in 1921 from the 1919 high (in 1919 the total was $158,548,000; in 1921, it was $98,164,000).

Here is a listing of brands; most are internal horn acoustic models from the late 1910’s and early 1920’s. A few have external horns. Most were manufactured in the United States; a few are Canadian, English, or European. Dates that refer to the TMW issue feature a machine’s first TMW advertisement, which in turn roughly indicates when a machine was first marketed. Manufacturers were quick to advertise in TMW all new products. Many but not all companies applied for a trademark. Models that refer to “EM” indicate e-mail contact with someone with a still-existing machine; little is known about most of these brands as they were probably limited in production and distribution and for many we only have the brand name.

After the introduction of the Orthophonic Victrola in late 1925, several off-brand companies produced phonographs with enlarged internal horns and reproducers with a thin aluminum or aluminum alloy diaphragm in order to play the new electrically recorded records which had not only more volume but much expanded fidelity over the acoustically recorded 78 rpm shellac records. Often the new brands used the suffix “-phonic,” such as Alethephonic, Ampliphonic, Charmaphonic, Hunt-O-Phonic, Mello-Phonic and Parlo Phonic. The new phonograph models made all earlier models obsolete, although to “upgrade” older machines, several firms produced Orthophonic-type reproducers to install onto the tone arms of earlier models.

During the 1920’s the J. A. Fisher Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, manufacturers of Valley Forge mainsprings and other talking machine parts, gradually purchased from manufacturers obsolete and spare hardware items from older phonograph models. By 1930 the Fisher Company claimed to have the largest supply of talking machine repair materials in existence at their facility at 393 Seventh Avenue in New York City. Fisher produced a 200 page catalogue of parts and advertised they could provide a single part or thousands as may be needed. Parts even included stylus bars, gear trains, and replacement springs.

A Representative Listing of Some Known “Off Brand” Talking Machines

1. Abercrombie & Fitch – unusual portable in a cylindrical metal case EM

2. Adkins-Royal – Louisville, Kentucky. EM

3. Adler-Royal — Louisville, New York. EM

4. Adora — Adora Phonograph Company, 242 East Jefferson Avenue, Detroit, Michigan. May, 1920 TMW

5. Aladdaphone – Bay City, Michigan. EM

6. Alethetone — Stevens Organ and Piano Company, Marietta, Ohio. April 1917 TMW

7. Ambassador – Ambassador Phonograph Company, Suite 300, 19 West Jackson Blvd., Chicago, Illinois. October 1921 TMW

8. American – American Phonograph Company, 111 Lyon Street, Grand Rapids, Michigan. August 1917 TMW

9. American Maid – C. John A. Woods and Son, 30 Church Street, New York City, New York. March 1918 TMW

10. American Merchant — American Merchant Syndicated. EM

11. Americanola – American Talking Machine Company, Bloomberg, Pennsylvania. August 1920 TMW

12. Amerinola – Amerinola Company, 1 Vandalia Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio. December 1919 TMW

13. Amphion – T. Eaton Company, Toronto, Canada. April 1920 The Toronto World

14. Ands Koch – Ands Koch, 296 Broadway, New York City, New York. April 1916 TMW

15. Angelophone – The Angelico Company, 122 Columbus Heights, Brooklyn, New York. EM

16. Angelus — Angelus Phonograph Company, 1249 Lexington Avenue, New York City, New York. August 1917 TMW

17. Aretino — table model with very large spindle; Consolidated Talking Machine Company. Chicago “client brand” of the Columbia Phonograph Company

18. Arietta – Roundtree Corporation, Richmond, Virginia. July 1920 TMW

19. Arionola – Arionola Manufacturing Company, 250 Devonshire Street Boston, Massachusetts. September 1914 TMW

20. Armoniola – Thomas Manufacturing Company, Dayton, Ohio. November 1916 TMW

21. Arrow – Arrow Phonograph Corporation, 16 West 39th Street, New York City, New York. February 1920 TMW

22. Artanola – Saginaw Sectional Book Case Company, Saginaw, Michigan. March 1923 TMW

23. Art Craft Line – The Art Craft Company, Grand Rapids, Michigan. September 1918 TMW

ArtCraftLine

24. Artofola – The Artofola Company, Springfield, Illinois. October 1916 TMW

25. Artophone – The Artophone Company, 454 North Boyle Avenue, St. Louis, Missouri. January 1916 TMW

ArtophoneMarch1917

26. Arwall – Arwall Manufacturing Company, Minneapolis, Minnesota. EM

27. Ashland – Ashland Manufacturing Company, 43rd and Hermitage Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. November 1916 TMW

AshlandMarch1917

28. Autonola – Briggs Manufacturing Company. EM

29. Autophone – American Phonograph Company, 102 West 101st Street, New York City, New York. January 1915 TMW

30. Baby – Garford Manufacturing Company, Elyria, Ohio. February 1919 TMW

Garford Baby

31. Bamcola – Bachman Manufacturing Company, Ivanhoe & Southwest Avenue, St. Louis, Missouri. December 1919 The Music Trades

32. Batalma – Batavia, New York. EM

33. Beacon – Beacon Phonograph Company, 258 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts. January 1920 TMW

Beacon

34. Belcanto – The Belcanto Company, 130 West 42nd Street, New York City, New York. March 1919 TMW

35. Bell – Durable Phonograph Company, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio. EM

36. Berg Artone – Long Island City, New York. EM

37. Birch – portable model. EM

38. Blandin – Racine Phonograph Company, Inc., Racine, Wisconsin. July 1920 TMW

39. Blue Bird – Blue Bird Talking Machine Company, Los Angeles, California. April 1920 TMW

40. Bobolink – A. C. Gilbert Company, 460 Blatchley Avenue, New Haven, Connecticut. October 1921 TMW

41. Boetsch – Boetsch Brothers, New York City, New York. EM

42. Brendonne – Brendonne Corporation, 9 Central Avenue, Newark, New Jersey. December 1920 TMW

43. Broadcaster – Broadcaster Corporation, 2414 West Cullerton Street, Chicago, Illinois. November 1923 TMW

44. Brooks – Brooks Manufacturing Company, Saginaw, Michigan. September 1916 TMW

BrooksMarch1917

45. Bruce – Bruce Company, Springfield, Illinois. EM

46. Burnham – Burnham Phonograph Manufacturing Company, Los Angeles, California. EM

47. Bush & Lane – Bush & Lane Piano Company, Holland, Michigan. July 1918 TMW

Bush&LaneOct1918

48. Busy Bee — table model with a lug on the turntable to permit playing of Busy Bee discs; Consolidated Talking Machine Company. Chicago “client brand” of the Columbia Phonograph Company.

49. Cadillac – Clements Manufacturing Company, 601-613 Fulton Street, Chicago, Illinois. EM

50. Campbell – Campbell Industries, 36 State Street, Chicago, Illinois. July 1920 TMW

CampbellJuly1920

51. Camp=Fone – Camp=Fone, 334 Fifth Avenue, New York City, New York. April 1923 TMW

52. Cardinal – Cardinal Phonograph Company, Zanesville, Ohio. August 1919 TMW

Cardinal

53. Carmen – G. W. Huntley & Company, 25 East Lake Street, Chicago, Illinois. December 1920 TMW

54. Carola – The Carola Company, 310 Lakeside Avenue, N.W., Cleveland, Ohio. October 1922 TMW

55. Carry-A-Phone – Davenport Phonograph Accessories Company, Inc., Davenport, Iowa. June 1924 TMW

56. Carryola – Carryola Company of America, 647 Clinton Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. July 1924 TMW

CarryolaFlapperSept1925

57. Castle – Castle Phonograph Company, 53 Maiden Lane, New York City, New York. May 1916 TMW

58. Caswell – Caswell Manufacturing Company, St. Paul Avenue at 10th Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. August 1925 TMW

59. Cathedral – Cathedral Phonograph Company, Omaha, Nebraska. December 1919 TMW

Cathedral

60. Caviness – Caviness Talking Machine Company, Inc., Battle Creek, Michigan. November 1920 TMW

61. Cecilian – models sold by Montgomery Ward & Company; “client brand” of the Columbia Phonograph Company.

Cecelian1916catalog

62. Cecilaphone – Bush & Lane Piano Company, Holland, Michigan. July 1918 TMW

63. Century – Century Cabinet Company, 25 West 45th Street, New York City, New York. August 1917 TMW

CenturyOct1917 CenturySept1917

64. Ceramiphone – Smith-Phillips Music Company, East Liverpool, Ohio. March 1920 TMW

65. Charmaphone – R. L. Kenyon Manufacturing Company, 39 West 32nd Street, New York City, New York. October 1918 TMW

CharmophoneOct1918

66. Cheney – Cheney Talking Machine Company, 24 North Wabash Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. March 1918 TMW

CheneyMarch1918

67. Chautaugua – Chautaugua Phonograh Company, Silver Creek, New York. EM

68. Chimonola – Chimonola Company, 131 The Arcade, Cleveland, Ohio. September 1919 TMW

69. Choraleon – Choraleon Phonograph Company, Elkhart, Indiana. EM

70. Chorister – Chorister Phonograph Company, 336 West 63rd Street, Chicago, Illinois. October 1919 TMW

Chorister Oct 1919

71. Cirola – Cirola Phonograph Corporation 1227 Germantown Avenue, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. April 1920 TMW

72. Clarinola – George B. Clark Company, Inc., Bridgeport, Connecticut. EM

73. Classique – Classique Phonograph Corporation, 410 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. November 1917 TMW

74. Claxtonola – Brenard Manufacturing Company, Iowa City, Iowa. January 1919 TMW

Claxtonola

75. Clayola – Bristol and Barber Company, Inc., 3 East 14th Street, New York City, New York. November 1922 TMW

76. Cleartone – The Lucky 13 Phonograph Company, 3 East 12th Street, New York City, New York. July 1916 TMW

CleartoneAug1917 CleartoneMay1918 CleartoneMarch1919

77. Cleola – Tyrola Phonograph Company, Wilmette, Illinois. January 1920 TMW

78. Collerola – George Coller, Reading, Pennsylvania. EM

79. Compatophone —The Sterno Manufacturing Company, Ltd., London, England. October 1916 TMW

80. Concertola – World Phonograph Company, 218 South Wabash Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. March 1917 TMW

81. Conqueror – Franz Brückner Manufacturing Company, 105-107 East 29th street, New York City, New York. May 1916 TMW

82. Consola – Consolidated Talking Machine Company, 227 West Lake Street, Chicago, Illinois. November 1917 TMW

83. Continental – Continental Furniture Carpet Company, Council Bluff, Iowa. EM

84. Cornish – Cornish Company, Washington, New Jersey

85. Cowan – The Classique Phonograph Corporation, 401 North Lincoln Street, Chicago, Illinois. October 1917 TMW

CowanClassiqueOct1917

86. Crafts – A. J. Crafts Piano Company, Richmond, Virginia. December 1919 TMW

87. Cremonia — Cremonia Phonograph Company, 14 Wall Street, New York City, New York. April 1919 TMW

88. Crescent – Crescent Talking Machine Company, Inc., 89 chambers Street, New York City, New York. October 1914 TMW

89. Crippen – The Crippen Company, Inc., 427 Fifth Avenue New York City, New York. January 1920 TMW

Crippen

90. Crosley – Crosley Phonograph Company, 1 Vandalia Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio. February 1920 TMW

91. Crystola – The Knabe Brothers Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. November 1915 TMW

92. Culptone – Culp Phonograph Company, 240 Broadway, New York City, New York. October 1918 TMW

CulptoneOct1918

93. Culver – Culver Talking Machine. EM

94. Dalion – Milwaukee Talking Machine Manufacturing Company, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. July 1919 TMW

95. Davenola – Davenport Cabinet Works, 829 West 2nd Street, Davenport, Iowa. November 1919 TMW

96. Davis – Davis Phonograph Company, Chicago, Illinois. EM

97. Deca-Disc – Deca-Disc Phonograph Company, Hanover, Pennsylvania. March 1922 TMW

DecaDisc

98. Delpheon – The Delpheon Company, 810-812 Boutell Place, Bay City, Michigan. September 1916 TMW

DelpheonMay1917

99. Deterling – Deterling Manufacturing Company, Tipton, Indiana. March 1920 TMW

100. Detmer-Phone – Chicago; St. Louis. EM

101. Diamond – Diamond Products Corporation, 25 West 43rd Street, New York City, New York. June 1922 TMW

DiamondJuvenileConsole

102. Dolce-Tone – Reed, Dawson, & Company, 6 West Park Street, Newark, New Jersey. October 1917 TMW

103. Domestic – Domestic Talking Machine Corporation, 33rd and Arch Streets, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. May 1916 TMW

104. Duffinola – The Duff Company, Elizabeth City, North Carolina. EM

105. Dulciphone – Grand Talking Machine Company, 366 Adam Street, Brooklyn, New York. February 1917 TMW

106. Dulcitone – Cable-Nelson Piano Company, Republic Building, Chicago, Illinois. February 1919 TMW

Dulcitone

107. Duo-Vox – Bush & Lane Piano Company, Holland, Michigan. April 1924 TMW

108 Dusonto – The Belcanto Company, Inc., 130 West 42nd Street, New York City, New York. January 1920 TMW

109. Eclipse – Eclipse Phonograph Company, 51 Lawrence Street, Newark, New Jersey.
March 1917 TMW

110. Edmondson – Edmondson Phonograph Company, 16-18 Washington Avenue, Irvington, New Jersey. November 1916 TMW

111. Electric – Electric Phonograph Company, Kalamazoo, Michigan. September 1920 TMW

112. Elmbro – Elmbro Talking Machine Company, St. Paul, Minnesota. April 1918 TMW

113. Elti-Nola – Charles H. Elting & Company, Chicago, Illinois. EM

114. Embrola – Embrola Talking Machine Company, Department “A”, St. Paul, Minnesota. January 1918 TMW

115. Emerson – Plaza Music Company, 14 West 20th Street, New York City, New York. October 1915 TMW

EmersonAug1920

116. Empire – Empire Phonograph Company, Richmond, Virginia. July 1915 TMW

117. Empire – Empire Talking Machine Company, 429 South Wabash Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. December 1915 TMW

EmpireSept1917

118. Eubanola – Ramos-Eubank Phonograph Manufacturing Company, Richmond, Virginia. March 1919 TMW

119. Eufonola – Acme Cabinet Company, 116 West 32nd Street, New York City, New York. November 1916, TMW

120. Everton – Everton Company, Chicago, Illinois. EM

121. Excel – Excel Cabinet Company, 136 West 23rd Street, New York City, New York. February 1920 TMW

122. Fairy – Endless-Graph Manufacturing Company, 4200-4202 West Adams Street, Chicago, Illinois. October 1919 TMW

Fairy

123. Favorite – Favorite Talking Machine Company, 438 Broadway, New York City, New York. September 1916 TMW

124. Favorola – Bon-Ton Manufacturing Company, 211 South Broadway, St. Louis, Missouri. October 1920 TMW

125. Federal – Federal Phonograph and Supply Company, 8 South Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois. October 1919 TMW

126. Fern-O-Grand – Fern-O-Grand Company, 212 West Central Parkway, Cincinnati, Ohio. March 1920 TMW

FernOGrand

127. Firestone – Firestone Phonograph Company, 59 East van Buren Street, Chicago, Illinois. April 1919 TMW

128. Fischer – J. & C. Fischer, Inc., 417 West 28th Street, New York City, New York. March 1922 TMW

FischerNeedleBars

129. Flemish – Lynn Phonograph Company, 269 37th Street, Brooklyn, New York. June 1916 TMW

Flemish

130. Fraad – Fraad Talking Machine Company, Inc., 225 Lexington Avenue, New York City, New York. December 1915 TMW

131. Franklin – Franklin Phonograph Company, 10th and Columbia Avenues, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. July 1919 TMW

FranklinJuly1919

132. Fremont – Fremont Manufacturing Company, New York. EM

133. Fullertone – Fullertone Phonograph Products, Inc. January 1922 TMW

134. Fulton – Fulton-Alden Company, Inc., Waukegan, Illinois. November 1917 TMW

Fulton-AldenJan1918

135. Gabelola – Gabel’s Entertainer Company, 210 North Ann Street, Chicago, Illinois. March 1917 TMW

Gabel-OlaMarch1917

136. Garford – The Garford Manufacturing Company, Elyria, Ohio. February 1919 TMW

137. Gem Portable – Gem Phonograph Company, Inc., 109 North 10th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. July 1924 TMW

138. General – General Phonograph Manufacturing Company, Elyria, Ohio. November 1921 TMW

139. Genola – General Phonograph Company, Elvira, Ohio. EM

140. Granby – Granby Phonograph Corporation, Levy Building, Newport News, Virginia. August 1920 TMW

141 Grand – Grand Talking Machine Company, 366 Adams Street, Brooklyn, New York. January 1917 TMW

142. Grande – Grande Phonograph Company, 25 West Lake Street, Chicago, Illinois. September 1920 TMW

143. Grandola – Grandola Phonograph Company, 1269 Broadway, New York City, New York. November 1915 TMW

144. Guarantee – Guarantee Talking Machine Supply Company, 109 North 10th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. June 1925 TMW

145. Gunsonola – Brandford, Ontario, Canada. EM

146. Hallet & Davis – Hallet & Davis Company, Boston, Massachusetts. April 1922 TMW

147. Harmograph – Harmograph Talking Machine Company, St. Louis, Missouri. EM

148. Harmonia – Harmonia Talking Machine Company, 47 West 34th Street, New York City, New York. June 1920 TMW

149. Harmonola – The Harmonola Company, 1611 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. October 1916 TMW

150. Harmonophone – Meyers Drug Company. EM

151. Harmony — table model with large spindle; Consolidated Talking Machine Company. Chicago “client brand” of the Columbia Phonograph Company

152. Harmony – A floor model; not one of the large spindle Chicago table models

153. Harponola – The Celina Furniture Company, 101 Mercelina Park, Celina, Ohio. November 1917, TMW

154. Harpvola – Harpvola Talking Machine Company, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. March 1916 TMW

155. Harrolla – King Talking Machine Company, 11 West 25th Street, New York City, New York. January 1917 TMW

Harrolla March 1917

156. Hawthorn – Southern California Hardwood & Manufacturing Company, 1430 South Alameda Street, Los Angeles, California. September 1918 TMW

157. Hayne’ola – Hayne’ola Phonograph Corporation, Ottawa, Illinois. January 1917 TMW

158. Heintzman – Gerhard Heintzman Ltd., Sherborne Street, Toronto, Canada. September 1919 TMW

Heintzman Sept 1919

159. Hercules-Atlas – Hercules Talking Machine Company, 611-621 Broadway, New York, City, New York. November 1915 TMW

160. Hexaphone – The Regina Company, 47 West 34th Street, New York City, New York. February 1917 TMW

161. Heywood-Wakefield – Heywood Brothers and Wakefield Company, Gardner and Wakefield, Massachusetts. January 1920 TMW

Heywood-Wakefield

162. Hiawatha – Hiawatha-Ottawa Pianophone Company, Ottawa, Illinois. May 1917 TMW

Hiawatha Jan 1918

163. Hoffay – Hoffay Talking Machine Company, 3 West 29th Street, New York City, New York. May 1917 TMW

164. Horsburgh – Canon Sales Company, Lincoln, Nebraska. EM

165. Humanatone – Humanatone Talking Machine Company, 254 North 10th Street, Brooklyn, New York. February 1917 TMW

Humanatone March 1917

166. Humanola – Humanola Talking Machine Company, Meyersdale, Pennsylvania. May 1917 TMW

167. Ideal – United Talking Machine Company, 178 Emmet Street, Newark, New Jersey. October 1916 TMW

168. Imperial – Imperial Talking Machine Company, First Street & Keefer Avenue, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. September 1915 TMW

169. Imperial – Imperial Talking Machine Company, 9 Vandever Avenue, Wilmington, Delaware. January 1917 TMW

Imperial May 1917

170. Independent – Independent Talking Machine Company, Inc., 12 East 42nd Street, New York City, New York. November 1919 TMW

171. International – International Talking Machine Company, 1216-1222 South Jefferson Street, Chicago, Illinois. November 1915 TMW

172. Interpretone – Crippen Company, New York City, New York. April 1920 TMW

173. Jewel – Jewel Phonograph Company, Indianapolis, Indiana. EM

174. Jewett – Jewett Phonograph Company, 958 Penobscot Building, Detroit, Michigan. March 1921 TMW

175. Juvenile – Dayo Manufacturing Company, 322 Third Street, Dayton, Ohio. October 1924 TMW

176. Kamophone – Illinois Phonograph Company, 400-412 West Erie Street, Chicago, Illinois. July 1921 TMW

177. Kamp-Fone – Kamp-Fone Health Builders, Inc., 224 Fifth Avenue, New York City, New York. April 1923 TMW

178. Keen-O-Phone – Keen-O-Phone Company, 136-138 South 4th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. June 1914 TMW

179. Kiddiephone – The Wilkins Toy Company, Keene, New Hampshire. January 1917 TMW

180. Kimball – W. W. Kimball Company, Kimball Building, Chicago, Illinois. September 1916 TMW

181. Kimberley – Kimberley Phonograph Company, Perth Amboy, New Jersey. October 1923 TMW

182. Knickerbocker – portable model EM

183. Knox – Knox Phonograph Company. EM

184. Kompact – Plaza Music Company, 10 West 20th Street, New York City, New York. October 1925 TMW

185. Ko-Hi-Ola – Koehler and Hinrichs, St. Paul, Minnesota. November 1916 TMW

186. Koch-O-Phone – Ands Koch, 296 Broadway, New York City, New York. May 1917 TMW

Koch-O-Phone Dec 1917

187. Kurtzman – Kurtzman Phonograph Company, Inc., Buffalo, New York

188. Lakeside – Lakeside Supply Company, 416 South Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois. April 1920 TMW

189. Lakeside – models sold by Montgomery Ward & Company; “client brand” of the Columbia Phonograph Company

190. Lampagraph – Lampagraph Company, Rialto Theatre Building, St. Louis, Missouri. August 1920 TMW

Lampagraph

191. Lampograph – Frank H. Feraud, 1911 State Street, Granite City, Illinois. December 1918 TMW

192. Lark – Quality Manufacturing Company, Louisville, Kentucky. EM

193. L’Artiste – Grand Rapids Phonograph Company, 1400 Front Avenue, Grand Rapids, Michigan. May 1919 TMW

194. La Sallephone – The La Salle Company, Chicago, Illinois EM

195. Lauter – H. Lauter Company, West Washington and Harding Streets, Indianapolis, Indiana. June 1923 TMW

196. Lauzon – Michigan Phonograph Company, 705 Ashton Building, Grand Rapids, Michigan. February 1919 TMW

197. Lawson – Lawson Piano Company, 372 East 149th Street, New York City, New York. January 1920 TMW

198. Leeds U-Phone – U-Phone Company, Ltd., Leeds, England. EM

199. Liberty – Liberty Phonograph Company, 313 Wilmac Building, Minneapolis, Minnesota. June 1918 TMW

Liberty

200. Librola — Seaburg Manufacturing Company, Jamestown, New York. Aril 1920 TMW

Librola April 1920

201. Linerphone – Linerphone Talking Machine Company, 1801 Nebraska Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. October 1918 TMW

202. Little Wonder – Freemont Manufacturing Company, New York City, New York. EM

203. Lois – Chicago, Illinois. EM

204. Lone-Star – Texas Talking Machine Company, Dallas, Texas. November 1921 TMW

205. Loraine – Chicago, Illinois. EM

206. Lorophone – Lorimer-Hicks Manufacturing Company, Republic Building, Chicago, Illinois. February 1917 TMW

207. Ludlow – A. J. Crafts Piano Company, 218 North 2nd street, Richmond, Virginia. November 1919 TMW

208. Lundstrom Converto EM

Lundstrom Converto March 1918

209. Lucky 13 – The Lucky 13 Phonograph Company, 3 East 12th Street, New York City, New York. September 1916 TMW

Lucky 13

210. Lynertone – Lynertone Talking Machine Company,18 West 20th Street, New York City, New York. October 1919 TMW

211. Lyradion – Lyradion Sales and Engineering Company of the Dodge Manufacturing Company, Mishawaka , Indiana. April 1922 TMW

Lyradion

212. Lyreola – Lyre-Ola Manufacturing Company, 1504 Pine Street, St. Louis, Missouri. April 1920 TMW

213. Lyrian – Lyrian Phonograph Company, 621 Main Street, Cincinnati, Ohio. November 1916 MW

214. Lyric – Lyraphone Company of America, 220 Fifth Avenue, New York City, New York. April 1916 TMW

215. Lyrolian – American Talking Machine Company, Bloomsberg, Pennsylvania. October 1920 TMW

216. Madison – Madison Music Company, 114 East 28th Street, New York City, New York. January 1922 TMW

217. Maestro—Lanski Company, 1414 South Wabash Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. April 1920 TMW

218. Maestrola – Sound Reproduction Company, Inc., 56 Liberty Street, New York City, New York. September 1916 TMW

219. Mag-Ni-Phone – Charles W. Shonk Company, 707 St. Charles Street, Maywood, Illinois. October 1916 TMW

Mag-Ni-Phone March 1917

220. Magnola – Magnola Talking Machine Company, 711 Milwaukee Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. May 1916 TMW

Magnola Oct 1917

221. Majestic – Majestic Phonograph Company, McClure Building, 218 South Wabash Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. May 1916 TMW

222. Majestrola — Bell & Voss Berlin. EM

223. Mandel – Mandel Manufacturing Company, 501 Laflin Street, Chicago, Illinois. August 1916 TMW

Mandel

224. Manophone – James Manoil Company, Inc., 60 Broadway, NewYork City, New York. July 1916 TMW

Manophone July 1921

225. Marvelon – Mavelon Phonograph Company, 508 Arcade Building, St. Louis, Missouri. March 1920 TMW

226. Marvelola – Weser Brothers, 524 West 23rd Street, New York City, New York. January 1920 TMW

227. Mascot – Mascot Talking Machine Company, 66 West 37th Street, New York City, New York. August 1916 TMW

228. Mastercraft – Wolf Manufacturing Industries, Quincy, Illinois. September 1925 TMW

229. Masterola – Master Talking Machine Corporation, 381 Fourth Avenue, New York City, New York. April 1915 TMW

230. Masterpiece – Masterpiece Phonograph Company, 2318-2320 Western Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. September 1920 TMW

231. Masterphone – Masterphone Talking Machine Company, Boston Piano & Music Company, Iowa City, Iowa and Chicago, Illinois. EM

232. Mastertone – Iroquois Sales Corporation, 10 North Division Street, Buffalo, New York. March 1920 TMW

233. McLagan – Ontario, Canada. EM

234. Melotone – Superior Phonograph Company, 320 South Wabash Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. April 1920 TMW

235. Mellowtone – Mellophone Talking Machine Company, 376 Lafayette Street, New York City, New York. August 1916 TMW

Melophone May 1917

236. Melodia – Melodia Phonograph Company, 400 North Sangamon Street, Chicago, Illinois. February 1920 TMW

237. Melodograph – Melodograph Corporation, 142-146 West 14th Street, New York City, New York. November 1916 Cosmopolitan Magazine

238. Melody – Melody Naitonal Sales Company, 190 North State Street, Chicago, Illinois. May 1921 TMW

239. Melophone – Melophone Talking Machine Company, 376-378 Lafayette Street, New York City, New York. August 1915 TMW

240. Meteor – Meteor Motor Car Company, Piqua, Ohio. May 1917 TMW

Meteor May 1917

241. Metro – Metro Phonograph Company, 55 Vesey Street, New York City, New York. September 1919 TMW

242. Metrophone – Joseph Hagn & Company , Chicago, Illinois. Advertised in The Billboard, December 8 1917

243. Metrophone – Franz Bruckner Manufacturing Company, 405 Broadway, New York City, New York. October 1916 TMW

244. Mignonphone – L. S. & E. H. Walker, 350 Madison Avenue, New York City, New York. October 1925 TMW

245. Minelli – Minelli Phonograph Company, Inc., Pittson, Pennsylvania. September 1925 TMW

246. Mockingbird – Edwin M. Wright, Manteno, Illinois. January 1920 TMW

247. Modernola – Modernola Company, Johnstown, Pennsylvania. May 1919 TMW

Modernola

248. Monarch – Monarch Phonograph Company. EM

249. Morenus – Morenus Piano Company, 341 West Superior Street, Chicago, Illinois. February 1918 TMW

250. Mozart – Mozart Talking Machine Company, 1432-1442 North 20th Street, St. Louis, Missouri. June 1916 TMW

Mozart Feb 1917

251. Multitone – Eau Claire, Wisconsin. EM

252. Munola – The Munzer Manufacturing Corporation, 307 South 6th Avenue, Minneapolis, Minnesota. November 1917 TMW

Munola April 1918

253. Music Master – Sturgis, Michigan. EM

254. Musicola – Musicola Talking Machine Company, 242 Knickerbocker Avenue, Brooklyn, New York. March 1920 TMW

255. Musictrola – Passow & Sons, 832 -842 Madison Street, Chicago, Illinois. March 1916 TMW

256. Mutual – Mutual Talking Machine Company, Inc., 145 West 45th Street, New York City, New York. July 1916 TMW

257. National Bluebird – National Talking Machine Company, 118 East 28th Street, New York City, New York. August 1916 TMW

258. National Harmonona – National Clock & Manufacturing Company EM

259. Natural Voice – Natural Voice Phonograph Company, Oneida, New York. November 1919 TMW

260. New Comfort – New Comfort Talking Machine Company, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. June 1920 TMW

261. Newman Brothers – Newman Brothers Company, 410 South Michigan Blvd., Chicago, Illinois. April 1920 TMW

262. Nightingale – Nightingale Manufacturing Company, 422 North Armour Street, Chicago, Illinois. June 1918 MW

263. Nirona – The Favorite Manufacturing Company, New York City, New York. October 1925 TMW

264. Northhome – Portable model EM

265. Nytrola – T. & H. Specialty Company, Charleston, West Virginia. January 1921 TMW

266. Ogdenola – Ogden Manufacturers, Chicago, Illinois. EM

267. Olympian – Cole and Dunas Music Company, 54 West Lake Street, Chicago Illinois. January 1920 TMW

268. O’Neil – M. O’Neil Department Store, Akron, Ohio; made by United Manufacturing, Chicago, Illinois. EM

269. Onken – Oscar Onken Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. January 1920 TMW

270. Operollo – Operollo Phonograph company, Inc., 420 Lightner Building, Detroit, Michigan. March 1917 TMW

OperolloMarch1917

271. Oranola – Perfection Talking Machine Company, Inc., 129 De Graw Street, Brooklyn, New York. August 1919 TMW

272. Orchestrola – The Thomas Manufacturing Company, Dayton, Ohio. June 1916 TMW

273. Oriola – Metropolis Sales Company, 27 Union Square, New York City, New York. April 1917 TMW

274. Oro-Tone – The Oro-Tone Company, 1000-1010 George Street, Chicago, Illinois. June 1922 TMW

275. Orsenigo – Orsenigo Company, Inc., 110 West 42nd Street, New York City, New York. February 1922 TMW

276. Outing – Outing Talking Machine Company, Mount Kisko, New York. November 1921 TMW

277. Oxford – The Mundler Corporation, 1123 Broadway, New York City, New York. December 1920 TMW

278. Paillard – portable phonograph; probably a Swiss brand. EM

279. Pal – Plaza Music Company, 18 West 20th Street, New York City, New York. June 1922 TMW

280. Paramount – Paramount Talking Machine Company, Port Washington, Wisconsin. February 1920 TMW

281. Parlephone – E. E. Tower, St. Joseph, Missouri. April 1919 TMW

282. Passow – Passow & Sons, 832 – 842 Madison Street, Chicago, Illinois. February 1916 TMW

283. Peerless – Republic Phonograph Company, 18 East Jackson Blvd., Chicago, Illinois. February 1917 TMW

284. Perfectone – D. T. Bohon Company, Lexington, Kentucky. EM

285. Perfek’Tone – wicker cabinets made by Heywood Brothers and Wakefield Company, Gardner and Wakefield, Massachusetts. January 1920 TMW

286. Perfectrola – Milwaukee Talking Machine Manufacturing Company, 416 Fourth Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. January 1916 TMW

Perfectrola Oct 1918

287. Perkins – Chicago, Illinois. EM

288. Peter Pan – Peter Pan Gramophone Company, 342 Madison Avenue, New York City, New York. March 1925 TMW

Peter Pan

289. Pet-O-Fone – Pet-O-Fone Manufacturing Company, 557 Broadway, New York City, New York. May 1925 TMW

290. Phoenix – Phoenix Phonograph Company, 2504 West Van Buren Street, Chicago, Illinois. July 1919 TMW

291. Phon d’Amor — Fritzsch Phonograph Company, 228 West 7th Street, Cincinnati, Ohio. November 1917 TMW

Phon D'Amour Jan 1918

292. Phon-O-Bench – Phon-O-Bench Company, 1803 Irving Park Blvd., Chicago, Illinois. December 1920 TMW

293. Phono-Grand – J. P. Seeburg Piano Company, Republic Building, Chicago, Illinois. November1917 TMW

Seeburg Phono-Grand

294. Phonograhic Table – Phonographic Table Company, 25 West 32nd Street, New York City, New York. March 1917 TMW

Phonographic Table March 1917

295. Phonola – Caloric Sales Company, 1381 Continental and Commercial Bank Building, Chicago, Illinois. October 1916 TMW

296. Phonolamp – Electric Phonograph Company, 29 West 34th Street, New York City, New York. June 1916. TMW

297. Pianophone — EM

298. Piknik – Piknik Portable Phonograph, Inc., Lakewood, New Jersey. November 1920 TMW

299. Playerphone – Playerphone Talking Machine Company, 802 Republic Building, Chicago, Illinois. March 1916. TMW

300. Player-Tone – Player Tone Talking Machine Company, 967 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. March 1920 TMW

301. Playtime – Plaza Music Company, 10 West 20th Street, New York City, New York. September 1925 TMW

302. Playonola – Playonola Talking Machine Company, 1210 Third Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. May 1920 TMW

303. Plymouth – Plymouth Phonograph Company, Plymouth, Wisconsin. June 1921 TMW

304. Polk-Phone – James K. Polk, Inc., Atlanta, Georgia. EM

305. Pooley – Pooley Furniture Company, Inc., 16th Street and Indiana Avenue, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. June 1916 TMW

306. Portrola – Portable Phonograph Company, Reserve Bank Building, Kansas City, Missouri. February 1920 TMW

307. Portophone – The Tri Sales Company, 616 Victoria Building, St. Louis, Missouri. February 1920 TMW

308. Premier – Premier Cabinet Company, Williamsport, Pennsylvania. December 1915 TMW

309. Prima-Donna – General Sales Corporation, 1520 Buffum Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. May 1920 TMW

310. Puritan – United Phonographs Corporation, Sheboygan, Wisconsin. April 1918 TMW

Puritan

311. Pur-I-Tone – Pur-I-Tone Phonograph Company, Chicago, Illinois. EM

312. Qualitiphone – Qualitiphone Sales Corporation, 17 East 42nd Street New York City, New York. March 1922 TMW

313. Queenola – Queenola Phonograph Company — Masier & Weng, Allegan, Michigan. EM

314. Ramosola – Ramos-Eubank Phonograph Manufacturing Company, Richmond, Virginia. March 1919 TMW

315. Realtone – Wells, Minnesota. EM

316. Re-Call – The Huss Brothers Phonograph and Piano Company, 6 West Canal Blvd., Cincinnati, Ohio. December 1919 TMW

317. Recordion – Columbia Mantel Company, Leonard and Devoe Streets, Brooklyn, New York. July 1916 TMW

318. Recruit – Thornell-Manton, The Havermeyer Building at Courtland, Church, and Day Streets, New York City, New York. May 1918 TMW

319. Reflexophone – Reflexophone, Inc., 114 Fifth Avenue, New York City, New York. January 1916 TMW

320. Regina – Regina Phonograph Company, Rahway, New Jersey. October 1924 TMW

321. Reginaphone – The Regina Company, 47 West 34th Street, New York City, New York. May 1918 TMW

Reginaphone March 1918

322. Remington – Remington Phonograph Corporation, 1662 Broadway, New York City, New York. June 1920 TMW

323. Republic – Republic Phonograph Company, 18 East Jackson Blvd., Chicago, Illinois. February 1917 TMW

324. Retola – Ausonia Reed Furniture Company, 844 Gerard Avenue, New York City, New York. October 1920 TMW

325. Rex – Rex Talking Machine Company, 381 Fourth Avenue, New York City, New York. May 1915 TMW

326. Rhonola – Waters & Conley Company; portable model. EM

327. Rilonola — Riley Talking Machine Company, Inc., Utica, New York. EM

328. Rishell – Rishell Phonograph Company, Williamsport, Pennsylvania. October 1916 TMW

Rishell Feb 1917 Rishell No. 17

329. Riviera – Riviera Talking Machine Company, 848 Eastman Street, Chicago, Illinois. March 1919 TMW.

330. Rivoli – Vincennes Phonograph Company, Vincennes, Indiana. March 1924 TMW

331. Robinola – Robinola Talking Machine Company, 119 East 5th Street, Cincinnati, Ohio. June 1917 TMW

332. Robinson – Robinson Phonograph Corporation, 2702 South Alameda Street, Los Angeles, California. August 1921 TMW

333. Ross – Ross Talking Machine Company, 22nd Street and Glenwood Avenue, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. February 1920 TMW

334. Royal – Royal Phonograph Company, Inc., 606 Courtland Avenue, New York City, New York. November 1919 TMW

Royal

335. Savoy – Savoy Gramophone Company, Grand Street and East River, New York City, New York. October 1915 TMW

336. Saxola – Sachs and Company, 425 South Wabash Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. May 1919 TMW

337. Schubert – Bell Talking Machine Corporation, 1 West 139th Street, New York City, New York. June 1917 TMW

Schubert March 1918

338. Serenado – Serenado Manufacturing Company, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. August 1920 TMW

339. Shell-O-Phone – Shell-O-Phone Talking Machine Company, North American Building, Chicago, Illinois. July 1917 TMW

Shell-O-Phone patent Shell-O-Phone patent 2

330. Silvertone – Crescent Talking Machine Company, 89 Chamber Street, New York City, New York. February 1917 TMW

Silver Tone March 1917

341. Silvertone — models sold by Sears, Roebuck & Company; “client brand” of the Columbia Phonograph Company

342. Singaphone – Singaphone Talking Machine Company, Inc., 32 Union Square, New York City, New York. February 1917 TMW

343. Singerphone – The Singerphone Company, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. June 1920 TMW

344. Solophone – The Solophone Company, 306 Sussex Street, Harrison, New Jersey. October 1916 TMW

345. Solotone – Solotone Talking Machines, Lititz, Pennsylvania. February 1919 TMW

346. Sonata – Kesner and Jerlaw, 41 West 34th Street, New York City, New York. February 1920 TMW

347. Sona-Tone – Sona-Tone Phonograph Inc., 3421 Broadway, New York City, New York. April 1918 TMW

348. Spencerian – Westphono, Inc., 46 West 4th Street, St. Paul, Minnesota. April 1923 TMW

349. Spraytone – C.D.M. Trading Company, 109 Lafayette Street, New York City, New York. May 1922 TMW

350. Stafford – E. H. Stafford Manufacturing Company, 218 South Wabash Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. October 1919 TMW

351. Standard — table model with large spindle; Consolidated Talking Machine Company. Chicago “client brand” of the Columbia Phonograph Company

352. Starr – Starr Piano Company, Richmond, Indiana. September 1915 TMW

Starr Nov 1917

353. Steger – Steger and Sons Piano Manufacturing Company, Wabash and Jackson Streets, Chicago, Illinois. January 1919 TMW

Steger

354. Steinberg – Chicago, Illinois. EM

355. Steinburn – Stein-Burn Corporation, Heyworth Building, Madison and Wabash Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. July 1919 TMW

Steinburn July 1919

356. Steinola – The Steinola Company, 1221 West Lake Street, Chicago, Illinois. February 1917 TMW

357. Sterling – Sterling Phonograph Company, 285 North 6th Street, Brooklyn, New York. October 1917 TMW

358. Sterling – Sterling Talking Machine Company, Inc., 811-819 Norton Street, Chicago, Illinois. June 1919 TMW

359. Stewart – Stewart Phonograph Corporation, 2827 Lincoln Street, Chicago, Illinois. February 1916 TMW

Stewart April 1917

360. Stodart – Stodart Phonograph Company, 100 Southern Blvd., New York City, New York. June 1919 TMW

361. Stradivara – The Compton-Price Company, Coshocton, Ohio. September 1916 TMW

Stradivara July 1919

362. Strand – Manufacturers Phonograph Company, New York City, New York. November 1921 TMW

363. Stratford – Stratford Phonograph Company, Inc., Ashland, Ohio. July 1920 TMW

364. Strickler – Strickler Manufacturing Company, 434 West Chicago Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. September 1919 TMW

365. Supertone – Supertone Talking Machine Company, 10 West 20th Street, New York City, New York. August 1916 TMW

Supertone March 1917

366. Supreme – Stone Manufacturing Company, 7th & Chestnut Streets, St. Louis, Missouri. May 1920 TMW

Supreme May 1920

367. Supreme – Superior Phonograph Company, 320 South Wabash Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. January 1920 TMW

368. Swanola – makers of Black Swan Records, Pace Phonograph Corporation, 257 West 138th Street, New York City, New York. October, 1921 The Crisis Advertiser

369. Swanson – Swanson Sales Company, 308 West Ontario Street, Chicago, Illinois. July 1922 TMW

370. Symphonola – The Larkin Company, Buffalo, New York. EM

371. Symphony – Symphony Talking Machine Company, 47 West 42nd Street, Suite 31, New York City, New York. September 1915 TMW

372. Symphony — United Talking Machine Company, 608 South Dearborn Street, Chicago, Illinois. Table model with large spindle; Chicago client brand of the Columbia Phonograph Company

373. Tabe-A-Nola – Tabe-A-Nola Phonograph Company, Inc., Reading, Pennsylvania. September 13, 1919 The Music Trades

374. Tablatone – DeRivas and Harris Manufacturing Company, 135th Street at Willow Avenue, New York City, New York. August 1919 TMW

Tablatone

375. Tel-O-Tone – Western News Company, 21 East Austin Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. August 1918 TMW

Tel-o-tone

376. Thieryola – J. B. Thiery Company. EM

377. Tiffany – Tiffany Phonograph Sales Company, 1404 East 9th street, Cleveland, Ohio. October 1921 TMW

378. Ton-O-Graf – Ton-O-Graf Corporation, 112 East South Water Street, Chicago, Illinois. October 1917 TMW

379. Tonkola – William Tonk and Brother, 36th Street at 10th Avenue, New York City, New York. March 1918 TMW

380. Tonola – Tonola Phonograph Company, 11 South 7th Street, Minneapolis, Minnesota. May 1917 TMW

381. Toyola – Berg A. T. & S. Company, Long Island City, New York. EM

382. Toyphone – Toyphone and Woodware Manufacturers, Inc., 130 West 18th Street, New York City, New York. January 1917 TMW

383. Travelphone Portable – Specialty Phonograph & Accessories Company, 210-212 East 113rd Streets, New York City, New York. March 1924 TMW

384. Triton – Triton Phonograph Company, 137 Fifth Avenue, New York City, New York. January 1915 TMW

385. Udell – The Udell Works, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana. August 1925 TMW

386. Ultraphone Perkins – The Perkins Company, Chicago. EM

387. Unique – Dushene & Grimard Manufactories, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. EM

388. United – United Talking Machine Company, 178 Emmet Street, Newark, New Jersey. October 1916 TMW

389. Usona – Usona Talking Machine Company, 1977 Ogden Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. July 1919 TMW

390. Valuphone – Wizard Phonograph Company, Inc., 1977 Ogden Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. March 1922 TMW

391. Vanophone – Otto Heineman Phonograph Supply Company, 25 West 45th Street, New York City, New York. May 1916 TMW

Vanophone Sept 1918

392. Venus – The Venus Company, St. Louis, Missouri. EM

393. Venus Belle – Venus Company, 717 South Wells Street, Chicago, Illinois. March 1920 TMW

Venus Belle June 1920

394. Verdiola – Illinois Talking Machine Company, 56 West Washington Street, Chicago, Illinois. July 1918 TMW

395. Veritone – Veritone Talking Machine Company, 145 West 45th Street, New York City, New York. August 1918 TMW

396. Vermont – C. A. Hayles, Rutland, Vermont

397. Violaphone – Violaphone Talking Machine Company, 606 Consumers Building, Chicago, Illinois. October 1917 TMW

398. Virginia – W. P. Mertens Company, 107 West Main Street, Charlottesville, Virginia. October 1919 TMW

399. Virtuoso – Republic Phonograph Company, 18 East Jackson Blvd., Chicago, Illinois. January 1917 TMW

Virtuoso March 1917

400. Vista – Vista Talking Machine Company, The Wisconsin Chair Company, Port Washington, Wisconsin. August 1919 TMW

401. Vit – The Vit Talking Machine Company, 123 West Madison Street, Suite 412, Chicago, Illinois. March1920 TMW

402. Vitanola – Vitanola Talking Machine Company, 17 North Wabash Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. February 1915 TMW

Vitanola Sept 1917

403. Waddell – The Music Table Company, Greenfield, Ohio. September 1919 TMW

404. Wade – Wade Talking Machine Company, 12-20 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. August 1920 TMW

405. Waderola – Wade Talking Machine Company, 12 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. March 1920 TMW

406. Waters & Conley – portable model(s) EM

407. Watrola – Wartell Phonograph Company, 178 West Randolph Street, Chicago, Illinois. October 1919 TMW

Watrola Oct 1919

408. Wegman – Wegman Talking Machine Company, 47 South Clinton Avenue, Rochester, New York. October 1918 TMW

409. Weser – Weser Brothers, Inc., 520 West 43rd Street, New York City, New York. August 1917 TMW

Weser May 1919

410. Westrola – The Wesley Company, Chicago, Illinois. June 1920 TMW

411. White – White Sewing Machine Company, Cleveland, Ohio. EM

412. Widdicomb—Widdicomb Furnitue Company, Grand Rapids, Michigan. December 1917 TMW

Widdicomb Dec 1917

413. Wilson – Thomas E. Wilson & Company, Chicago, Illinois. March 1917 TMW

414. Windham — EM

415. Windsor – The Windsor Furniture Company, 1420 Carroll Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. October 1918 TMW

Windsor

416. Wissner – New York. EM

417. Witatone – Chicago, Illinois. EM

418. Wolf – Wolf Manufacturing Industries, Quincy, Illinois. October 1921 TMW

419. Wolverine – Lind & Marks Company, Congress & Bates Streets, Detroit, Michigan. September 1923 TMW

420. Wonder – Wonder Talking Machine Company, 102-104 West 38th Street, New York city, New York. September 1915 TMW

421. Wondertone – Columbus, Ohio EM

422. World – World Phonograph Company, 218 South Wabash Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. September 1917 TMW

World May 1917 World Sept 1917 World

423. Wycola – Wyeth Manufacturing. EM

424. Yale – Davis Sales and Manufacturing Company, 763 State Street, New Haven Connecticut. September 1923 TMW

425. Yohnola – Oliver Yohn & Sons, New York. EM

Still-existing models; mostly from e-mail contacts– models for which we have no information other than the brand name:

Academy
Allen
Artone
Autrola
Bergman
Californian
Cleartonola
Climax
Colonial
Craniograph
Deccalian
Dulcetto
Freeman
Glenola
Hrenola
Hymnophon
Hymophone
Jantzen
Kettrophone
Keystone
Lawrence
L-JOR
La Vita
Lydiaphone
Maytrol
Melody Maker
Munola
Moore
New Symphony
Northhome
Panola
Selecta
Terephon
Terpophon
Trinity
True-Tone
Unitone
Victory
Vonola